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with the disconnect that i was alluding to earlier between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental d
much. our next speaker is the co- founder and chief scientific officer of post-it science. he heads the company's goal team that has for more than three decades. he has been a leading pioneer in brain plasticity research. in the late 1980's, he was responsible for inventing something that i hope to own on my own, and in plans to approve my hearing. in 1996, he was the founder and ceo of scientific learning corporation, which markets and distributes software that applies principles of brain plasticity to assist children with language learning in reading. we are plowing -- proud to have him join us today to take part in this forum. [applause] >> thank you. i want to one-upping the mayor and say that today is my 70th birthday. [applause] still alive and raising cain. i also want to say that i am a proud citizen of this city and a public servant at the university of california, in this city for more than 45 years. it is wonderful to be here and wonderful to be with you today. i want to say, before i start, that you should understand that i was permitted by the university of california o
of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know maybe somebody new, may be lo
, science. the next group of student s is our students who have the correct number of credits to be a junior, but they are missing one or more of those benchmarks. it could be for a variety of learners such as being an english-language student who have to take their core english classes later. it could be because they have failed one or two core classes. but these are students who have made the correct number of credits, but one of those benchmarks need to be made up. and then we have students who are "off-track," who should have 110 credits, but they are down to 80. we look at those students and say targeted credit recovery and credit options could graduate on time. and then we have moderately off-track and severely off-track students. so in looking at the overall data where we are now with our current junior class, the class of 2014. there is two charts. one of them shows our graduation requirements, which is the chart on the right. our graduation requirements currently are that you pass the courses within an a through a d grade. the uc-eligible, in order to get into uc, you do need to h
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
and the budget crisis here at s-j-s-u is dr. charles bullock ... the dean of the college of applied sciences and arts. thanks for joining us .... so dr. bullock, as an educator what stance are you telling your teachers to take in terms of prop 30? what is this school facing if prop 30 doesnt pass? what should students be prepared for or be doing to plan for next semester? can you guarantee that students who are planning to graduate next semester will be able to get the classes that they need? do you remain optimistic about the future of higher education in california and why? thanks for joining us dr.bullock the u-s census bureau says latinos make up one of six residents in the united states. so with the election day less then two weeks away... will the latino vote have an impact (?) update news' pedro garcia shows us the last minute push to register latinos to vote. ">>>on the corner of story and king in east san jose...a group that advocates for immigrant rights...siren attempted to get latinos registered to vote. jeremy barousse/ siren "we are out here registering voters. it's the last da
and i'm editor of real clear science.com. my background is microbiology. a friend of mine who became an ob gene why and set i look like a geek in that picture. that is my working in an anaerobic chamber. we grew all sorts of extremely slowly bacteria in that thing. i went to the university of washington in 2004 and got my ph.d. in 2010. i have been in the real world for two years. my personal science philosophy is straight forward and simple. if you are not an expert in his best to accept what is considered mainstream science. science should always come before politics. that means ideology or political parties are not beyond criticism. in my view i quaker team science. i don't come 14 rap or team blew. i think we shall always try to purge anti scientific thinking even if it is from our friends or political allies. so why science left behind? why pick on the left? the media is quick to cover anti scientific belief from conservatives like global warming and evolution. plot macon's made some rather an in lightning comment about pregnancy and for days this was a front-page story about ho
in science and engineering when they go to college they're less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study from the university of virginia found if you take two blacks or students of any color who one receives a large preference and one doesn't, the one that receives preference has a larger chance of dropping out. "mismatch" also affects academically inclined students who receive large preference who like to become university professors or academics. but predominantly receive low academic grades and decide economics is not for them. the biggest "mismatch" experiment was in california where voters passed a proposition with a large experiment of what happened when racial preferences are banned from university systems. it is extremely clear for anyone who played cares to look. within a half-dozen years the number of blacks in the university system has gone up by 30%. the number of blacks receiving a bachelor degrees went up by 70%. the number of degrees for hispanics, gpas of gone up. virtually every outcome has been a dramatic improvement. the colu
help doctors pinpoint those with the highest risk. abc7 news health and science reporter carolyn johnson has a look. >>> normal breaths for now. >> richard was a few strokes from the green when a strange feeling interrupted his round of golf. he knew he was uncomfortable, but the symptoms were vague. >> i got a burning sensation across my chest. it was not a pain. >> now it could be gastrointestinal, it could be their lungs or it could be a heart blockage and my job is listening to them and ferret out more selective symptoms that may pinpoint whether they have heart disease. >> the cardiologist said the goal is to avoid running everybody through tests which are effective but also carry side effects. >> a lot of radiation. ten years of radiation you get in that procedure. >> it includes prescreening patients with a cardio stress test, often involving a treadmill. now a bay area company believes it has an alternative that can help spot which patients are more likely suffering from heart disease more quickly. >> maybe an alcohol pad, bandaid, gauze. >> it was developed by palo alto
health and science reporter carolyn johnson has a look. >>> normal breaths for now. >> richard was a few strokes from the green when a strange feeling interrupted his round of golf. he knew he was uncomfortable, but the symptoms were vague. >> i got a burning sensation across my chest. it was not a pain. >> now it could be gastrointestinal, it could be their lungs or it could be a heart blockage and my job is listening to them and ferret out more selective symptoms that may pinpoint whether they have heart disease. >> the cardiologist said the goal is to avoid running everybody through tests which are effective but also carry side effects. >> a lot of radiation. ten years of radiation you get in that procedure. >> current options includes prescreening patients with a cardio stress test, often involving a treadmill. now a bay area company believes it has an alternative that can help spot which patients are more likely suffering from heart disease more quickly. >> maybe an alcohol pad, bandaid, gauze. >> it was developed by palo alto based cardio dx. it involves a blood draw that can be do
near the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30
arts and science dregrease. they might as well not go to college. we are facing a short fall of tech engineerings. and we are not doing anything to try to cover that short fall. sally is right. the problem is the public colleges is that the states are having to cut spend it is e priorities of the states spending can approximate but keeping the social entitlements and they reform them to give something to education. >> i am still using my communication degree. and sally, thank you for joining. >> tt is not liberal artings. >> oh, john. >> but mine. >> and forgethe election, why big laborororor >> it's time for what i need to know next week. >> after the election there is events to pssure lawmakers not to save social security and medicare. >> and john lay field. >> if you listen to wayne and johnathon you make money. there is a way to work with ford and it is a good stock. >> and up to wayne rogers. >> thank you, john. i like ford, too. the cash america trade suggest less and nine times earnings. >> johnathon? >> i like the floating rate funds pennant park. pflt. i ownit in my asset ma
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
's a crisis with girls, they learn their not strong in math and science and bears emphasis on trying to prove that and it will come as a shock that women far outstripped men in academic performance. >> guest: i have a daughter and two sons. it you occasion is the clearest argument. girls do better than boys and now they have equal as 80 scores in math and do better in verbal scores. it starts early in life and that is largely a development question. we demand a lot more of younger and younger children and girls develop faster than boys. that is where it starts and people say boys get a sense of themselves as a little bit of failures in school. not because they're less smart. boys and girls are equally smart. it has to do with extra issues like discipline and can you sit still and what schools are demanding of kids comes more naturally to girls than boys. i have an addendum to that i will get into in a minute and then you move to community college and other college and for every two degrees men get women get three degrees. that is a huge disparity. they reached parity about the 80s and since t
. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the screen. you will be watching up on the big screen as we play a game of tennis. are you ready? all right. we will select two players. that is me. does that look like me? it kind of those -- of does. does that look like mackenna? that is not by chance. you can make the person look like anything you want. they can even look like ali
here at that meeting. what do we know from the science? you can see the scientific references and see where the studies were done at different research universities, the mayo clinic, harvard, and other places to see what the confirmation is all about. we can see that it improves the basics. , u r her rider, your engagement is stronger. every improvement translates to about 14 years on the average. after they are trained, the improvement would give them the memory level of an average person of about 56. we see faster and sharper thinking and acting. almost everything you do that involves making a decision about what you have seen or heard or acting in a complex behavior. this is certainly important from the point of view of for your sustaining independence. this is kind of interesting thing, right? people see things so much better that they have about half as many driving accidents, it makes a big difference in the safety of driving and also walking. we have seen improvements in health. the person spends about $300 less a year in health-care costs, that is because the brain training co
the museum and the california academy of sciences, shakespeares garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring blossom association. flowers and plants played an important part in shakespeares literary masterpieces. here is an enchanting and tranquil garden tucked away along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. appreciate the beauty of its unique setting. the cherry tree, the brick walkways, the enchanting stones, the rustic sundial. chaired the bards'w ro -- share the bard's words. the garden is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, enjoy the sunshine and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare float you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. shakespeares garden is 8ada accessible. this park is located at the bottom of a hill. it is a secret garden with an infinite and captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, one block from the bottom of lombard street, it makes the top of our list for the most intimate picnic settings. avoid all tourist cars an
what this does for this region. you know the bay area has become the blue angels of science. we do lots of stunts, and we are very successful at doing those stunts and we do them at high speeds, and between this project and the project for cal train to electifiy it over the next seven years $3 billion is going to be spent regionally on transit here, and we can say thank you to the secretary of transportation and to the regional transit authorities who have create thursday opportunity for the transportation. >> >> that will create a 22nd century of transit for the tronst century of jobs so thank you to secretary lahood and thank you to the leadership for all that we have accomplished here today. [applause] >> peter rogof was dominated to serve in the federal administration by the department of transportation in 2009 by president barack obama. he has over see the disbursement throughout the country through the american reinvestment act and has done so meeting every milestone established by that act. getting money into hands of transit operators whose budgets were severely strained
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick conversation, chris convinced the
are in the education program for science or technology and how are we creating jobs in this country and infrastructure and anything like that. so most importantly, how are we fostering innovation in this country, that america, uniquely is founded on the grounds of innovation, we are here in the city where so much that have has happened in so many profound ways. and it seems like every time that we have such disruption in this country. and this time... the financial down turn and the pressure of cyber security and the pressures of so many other things, you know, in... how are we driving innovation forward to champion out of that like we have done over and over and over in the history of this country. in the government, plays a fascinating role in that. i will give you an example of a place that we are doing that, that gets the president excited. and that is when you are thinking differently about the digital assets and in last may... in new york and throughout the very non-governmental place to give a speech, got on stage and talked about fostering this of the 21st century government and the digital go
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. if we took the nissan altima and reimagined nearly everything in it? gave it greater horsepower and best in class 38 mpg highway... advanced headlights... and zero gravity seats? yeah, that would be cool. ♪ introducing the completely reimagined nissan altima. it's our most innovative altima ever. nissan. innovation that excites. ♪ >>> the waves churned up here along the chesapeake bay bridge in virginia beach. we're back with a final check on the path of hurricane sandy. weather channel meteorologist mike seidel is? virginia beach, new jersey tonight, where the wind is whipping up. where can we expect the storm to moving in the next few days? >> reporter: the atlantic now taking over the entire beach here at point pleasant. this morning's high tide was up to there. and lester tomorrow we have two disastrous high tides. by tuesday, this entire coastline is going to be rearranged. take a look at the swirl off cape hatteras, we're still more than 500 miles
of "advances in science and technology.". and representative todd akin's infamous remark about women's bodies shutting down to prevent pregnancy in cases of so-called "legitimate rape." >> so doctor, are these extreme remarks by republicans distancing themselves from these remarks, are they what are keeping abortion front and center? >> they are actions. they remind women of people trying to redefine rain rape. the words are bad enough. the actions are worse. >> i disagree, bonnie. i think it's to the less advantaged to keep this conversation going. most of them are concerned about the state of the economy and jobs and that's what they are going to the whole thinking about. >> what we know is abortion is the leading topic for women. 39% to 19% to the economy. with the electorate being 56% women, swing voters being a key women demographic, the candidates and the campaigns need to address the issue and have to be in front of it. that's why they are trying to make it an issue. >> i laugh because murdoch's comment along with todd akin, it's men bation the dumb remarks and not representative of th
of science. before the long ascrention and specially designed capsule, his body had been fitted with a multitude of sensors to record his heart rate, blood pressure and other vital life signs to monitor how the human body copes with sustained free fall and acceleration and deceleration. >> keep your head down. >> to stop his blood boiling, his lungs exploding and his body disinterest at the grating he washese a pressurized suit and the whole thing is funded by a soft drink manufacturer. >> start the cameras. and i've got an angel to take care of you. >> felix baumgartner, why did you want to do this? >> well, you know, i have been -- i always have been a very competitive person, since i was 16 years old i started skydiving and i always wanted to push the limits. that's the reason why i was working on this so hard. >> but it's not like competing at tennis or at pool or a running race. to put yourself on the edge of space miles and miles up, i mean, that's completely different. >> it is, but that's what makes it so unique and challenging, because if you look at my backgrounds as a
. political arts and science dregrease. they might as well not go to college. we are facing a short fall of tech engineerings. and we are not doing anything to try to cover that short fall. sally is right. the problem is the public colleges is that thetates are having to cut spend it is the priorities of the states spending can approximate but keeping the social entitlements and they reform them to give something to education. >> i am still using my communication degree. and sally, thank you for joining. >> that is not liberal artings. >> oh, john. >> but mine. >> and forget the election, [ engine revving ] ♪ [ male announcer ] every car we build must make adrenaline pump and pulses quicken. ♪ to help you not just to stay alive but feel alive. the new c-class is no exception. it's a mercedes-benz, through and through. see your authorized mercedes-benz dealer for exceptional offers through mercedes-benz financial services. sven's home security gets the most rewards of any small business credit card! how does this thinwork? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% casbac
employees. stem, science technology, engineering and math back grounds are absolutely essential. immigration is a huge issue. i hope in the next congress that we'll be able to take kind of one step at a time if we can't do comprehensive which i'm for comprehensive immigration reform that we deal with stem and that we allow employers to take a green card stapled to degrees so that we can fill out the workforce and patent reform is very important. i was told by the small -- it is a disaster that 40% -- they told me 40% of the lawsuits are around the issue of trolling. >> when you talk to people especially people who don't have that power, i think a lot of startup people ignore washington because they feel like they can't get anything done like it is ineffective and they shouldn't try. >> that's one way for someone to look at it. i think that representation makes a difference. so as i said, they can't travel across the country to the largest legislative body but i'm here and i go to them. so that's a very important message. again, as i said, i invited the republican chairman of the subcommittee
. our site is doing it because their cars get keyed and science get torn down. >> hi, my name is harry. i love your passion and your honesty all these years. i've seen you on media. and david, i admire him so deeply. mainly for that day she was going be campuses and taking them on right there in those places. i was a student in 1965 at kersten university and i was drawn by democrats into democrats into wanting to help take care of people are hearing the clarence thomas hearings, i switched to republican. the >> that's great. >> after the republicans inability to prosecute clinton all the way, i let them and became an independent and decided that was the best place i could find. i loved what you said about the courage of the black conservative. that's the subject i've been drawn to from the very beginning. it was in my heart in those days as a student, when i was in the march to montgomery, where it all got started. >> is this leading to question? >> i have value of my own, too. i wanted you to comment on the person of thomas soul if you don't mind. [applause] >> i think is the greatest
in these terms and thought of economics as a moral science. and that you needed to ask always the question enough for what, what is money for? otherwise you are adrift. you just go on accumulating without end, without purpose. so he said enough for a good life. and he thought that technology was bringing that about. that it was actually producing such increases in weths th s ise would be able to have abundance with a fraction of the work. that people would then do. but that bit of it hasn't come about. >> why? >> i think a number of explanations. one is that our society's become much more unequal than it was when canes was writing. the other is i think he underestimated the force of insatiablity. the relative character -- >> you end up with new needs and new wants. if you have one car, you feel like maybe it will be even more fun to have three. in the book it seems to me -- correct me if i'm wrong -- briefly what you're saying is you need a good what we would consider good or upper middle-class in terms of material comforts, house, things like that. beyond that, the kind of constant accumulation
of the bay, those places we expect 3 to 6 feet, maybe a meter higher than that. this is not an exact science and we don't have much data to work with. >> right. but you know it's going to be hitting in less than 15 minutes now. the key here to talk about also, victor, this will be a sustained wave, that is what we understand? how long could the wave -- >> yeah, fortunately, you know, in terms of the characteristics of the tsunami, we notice that the period in the near field, it was very short. in order of 10, 15 minutes between successive waves. remember, i want to remember, people, tsunami is not one wave, it's a train of waves. meaning that several waves in succession, they keep coming. so when you go to the far field in hawaii, we expect between waves around 25 minutes between them. so it's a relatively short period for a tsunami. that means it's not going to be as bad, for example, as tohoku, japan or anything like that, or the chile tsunami. it's not something of that magnitude. but yeah, you can have damage, you can have severe effects at several locations. >> well, it's good that you
to study. math and science. and english. exactly, yeah. i did not go to university, but being able to help them, i feel excited. >> i am going to be an accountant. >> i'm going to be a lawyer. >> and i'm going to be a nurse. >> the work that we're doing here is bringing change. >>> if there is one good thing about this storm it's that you can get evacuation information, all kinds of information through a lot of different sources. i'm going to tell you how you can do that online. we're downstairs in the cnn newsline. usually not that busy on a sunday night. we brought some people in. tom, one of the managers, and devon, i'm sorry, i had your e-mail up on the air. now he's getting random e-mails from everywhere. stop e-mailing devon. you can get information from tv news conferences, twitter feeds. we want to go to cnn's lori sau segall standing by for us in new york. >> reporter: a lot of people going to nyc.gov. i would say go to wnyc, this is important if you're in the new york area, in the northeast region, you can really look at the different zones. see what zone you're in. i went to it
sciences. on october 28th, the letters of humd, doctorate of humanities will be entitled on you. you will henceforth be known as espinola jackson humd. on behalf of dr. mcbride who gives congratulationses for this most deserved honor. >> congratulations. (applause) >> congratulations, doctor elect. and we look forward to your ministrations now from a higher level in the future. communications events calendar, [speaker not understood]. >> it's this, sir. >> i have one question. the letter summary includes a letter from the bay area water supply and conservation agency, and item e in communicationses was the regional water system report that was the subject of that letter. they made three specific requests of the commission and i was hoping that staff could give me an update as to what the disposition of those three requests was going to be. who is that staff person? >> i can actually do it. so, to answer your question, the report we do is a contractual requirement with our wholesale customers. the letter specifically that the very water supply [inaudible] requests that we actually do
a republican to of the science union over antagonism. then we can could see any republican future beyond the border. he did later on. as for the unity of the triumph of the republican party since the inception seward had been a major spokesmen for anti-slavery number weighed this from the irrepressible conflict and had to rappel from the assault on the left and the party asking for compromise did even if the most radical did vote they would offset the loss. sell it would become the great union party and as i said lincoln did turn that party etfs before the hostilities did not. yes he viewed the crisis from the partisan perspective but there was the third fundamental reason. the evidence suggests the visceral hatred of slavery. seward without question never gave slavery equality with free them but convinced with the rapid expansion of the free states with burgeoning economic power this overpowers slavery. to become casualties of what he foresaw as inevitable progress after accomplishing his purpose elected a republican seward was quite willing to stop. not selling 10. the territorial issu
the world is, like, 80% water, right? that means the world has to be like 90% air. that's just science. think it's weird to collect air? you wouldn't think so if you saw what your lungs collect every time you breathe. people can make fun of me all they want, but i choose to see the glass half-full. of air. protect your health with life-saving air quality updates from the american lung association. get our free "state of the air" app at lung.org. >> stos that win. >> go to any hospital they need equipment and i like it and i still lo it >> adam. chevron. neal inexpensive and healthy dividend and a safe stock. >>
to cut college tuition in half for the next decade. 100,000 math and science teachers in the next 10 years. [applause] we talk about jobs, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on. own a home, not red. have a decent school to send your child to. -- own a home, not rent. have a decent school to send your child to. helps send them to college. help your parents when they get older. that is why we are creating new manufacturing jobs, ted double exports. change the tax code, of four companies that come home, not those that go abroad. -- reward companies that come home, not those that go abroad. trained to million people over the next three years at community colleges. working with businesses to make sure students can finish school and go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we will continue to cut oil imports. in half by 2020, producing more american made energy. oil, clean coal, natural gas. those will create 600,000 new jobs. wind, biofuel, solar. we are already requiring automobiles to double their mileage by 2025. that alone will save $1.70 trillion at the pump a
'll send it back to youm. >> thank you, lara. >>> back out to sam, walk me through the science here, how long could they be on alert in hawaii? >> dan, first of all, as soon as that earthquake happened, knowing that it's 7.7, they did all of the right things. they put the warnings out, thinking that may this would be a bad run of waves. evacuating those lower levels of hawaii were a very good idea. so, you e initially think that first wave would run away from that, remember, this is a subsiding zone, one plate is underneath another plate. a little wave or two and one or two, three, in this case four waves went out and went toward hawaii and down the coast of california as well. now, normally, you would look for the bigger waves and the bigger tsunami problems, at an 58 or 9, they did the absolute right thing by getting those sirens out. these waves have been traveling, like two to four feet in many locations, you can't give everyone the all-clear until the entire system said that the water has traveled. until the buoys have said it's all calm you can't give the all clear. there may be mo
structure. >> this eighth grade science teacher says increased class size and lack of funds to upgrade her cramped, 1950s era classroom, are effecting her ability to teach. >> i cram 32 students into this small classroom. so, when, i mean, can you imagine doing a lab in here? i have four chairs to one table. with such large class sizes, i am not able to spend as much time with each student. >> california's schools haven't always relied on the state for the bulk of their funding. until the 1970s, districts raised most of their money through property taxes and bonds. rich districts flourished. poor and minority districts struggled. such inequality was ruled illegal by the state supreme court. then, in 1978, voters passed proposition 13, which capped property taxes. >> before proposition 13, california schools received the largest share of their dollars from local property tax revenues. after proposition 13 passed, local property tax revenues in the state fell by over 50%. >> in response, voters passed prop 98 in 1988, which guaranteed a minimum funding level for k through 12 education. today
. that is why we commit to cut college tuition in half for the next decade. 100,000 math and science teachers in the next 10 years. [applause] we talk about jobs, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on. own a home, not red. have a decent school to send your child wito. rent. a home, not have a decent school to send your child to. change the tax code, of four companies that come home, not those that go abroad. -- reward companies that come home, not those that go abroad. working with businesses to make sure students can finish school and go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we will continue to cut oil imports. in half by 2020, producing more american made energy. oil, clean coal, natural gas. those will create 600,000 new jobs. wind, biofuel, solar. we are already requiring automobiles to double their mileage by 2025. that alone will save $1.70 trillion at the pump and 12 million gallons -- barrels of oil over that time. the will level the playing field for the middle-class. because whenever the middle class is given a chance, they have never ever let their country d
to cut college tuition in half over the next decade. we committed to hire hundreds of science and math teachers over the next years. when we talk about the job, we talk about a decent job, a job you can raise a family on, own a home, not rent, have a decent school to send your child to come and be able to help send them to college, take care of your parents when they get older and save enough money that your children will not have to take care of you. that is why we are going to create new manufacturing jobs, change the tax code, reward companies that come home not those that go abroad. two million people, two million americans with the skills they need over the next three years at community colleges, working with businesses to ensure that when people finish school they can go into jobs that are now open. on energy, we're going to produce more american made energy, oil, clean coal, natural gas. alone, those will create 600,000 new jobs in 10 years. wind, solar, biofuel. we have already required automobiles to double their mileage. that alone will save 1.7 trillion dollars at the pump a
happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. anything wrong so far. >> greg, how are you? >> fine, thanks. >> did you have a good weekend? >> yes, uneventful. actually i had to work on sunday. i had a special episode of "the five," you know that show i do. >> vaguely. >> i have heard of it. >> it rated well. >> you keep talking about it. debate. miles, you were upset there were no women as part of the debate. how about the fact that for all four debates, the three presidential and the one vice presidential, all of the moderators were white? >> except barack obama who is part hawaii an. >> but he also -- i am talking about the moderators. >> that's disgusting. that's why we call it ameri-cacaca. >> and what about the state of journalism that they thought they couldn't find any qualified moderators of color? >> journalism is saying, hi, i am racist. actually anytime you see someone who is not -- who is white anywhere that is basically saying, hey, i hate blacks. >> really? >> even if you see a white guy walking down the stree. >> he immediately hates b
. what is a superstition? >> a belief or an action that is inconsistent with science. it needs to be aimed at bringing about good luck or avoiding bad luck. >> reporter: count yourself lucky if you're not superstitious. connecticut college psychologist stewart says most people are. in a world where we prize science, it may not be something to be proud of. >> i think only 40% of americans believe in evolution. >> reporter: what percent of americans believe in superstition. >> over half of americans have some kind of superstition that they believe in. >> reporter: so more americans have some specific superstition than believe in he have heution. >> that's right. that's not a good thing. >> reporter: a new cbs news poll for sunday morning finds more than half of all americans, knock on wood to avoid bad luck. 16% won't open up as indoors. 13% carry a good luck charm. and one in ten avoids black cats. at halloween we even have a holiday that celebrates our superstitions. nowhere are they celebrated more than here at the blood manor haunted house in new york city where you're surrou
with a real understanding of the science of the health impact, that marijuana is it a substance that is dangerous because it's illegal. it is not illegal on account of being dangerous. because it's not dangerous at all. [applause] it is well known that the impacts of marijuana are dangerous because of the illegal drug trade from marijuana drug prohibition. so the most important thing we can do to get rid of the health problems associated with marijuana is to legalize it. and on day one, on day one a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the d.e.a. to do a really radical thing. that would be to use science in determining what substances will and will not be scheduled. because marijuana is on a president, if she wanted to, could entrust the d.e.a. to oh, to -- could entrust the schedule. [applause] anded same goes for -- and the same goes for hemp, which is also a substance for which there are no bad drug effects. there are no bad health and safety effects. yet there are important health benefits. marijuana should be regulated but not in
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> all right. we continue to watch hurricane sandy. it's roughly about 200 miles off the coast of north carolina, roughly 500 miles from new york city. but places from north carolina all the way up to maine are bracing. in fact, we have a few updates. d.c., federal offices will be closed to the public tomorrow. we already know that washington, d.c., public schools are closed. more on hurricane sandy straight ahead. we know that mass transit from buses in new york will be closed or will shut down starting at 9:00 this evening and 7:00 for the subway system. that's impacting a bunch of people. much more ahead on "newsroom" with don lemon. this is a monster storm that could take many directions stat. states and cities are taking different directions and you can't be complacent. >> it is almost too late. you have been here since 2:00 on the snare. >> yeah, and you have a long haul for the evening. things will be changing on the dime, we know that.
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